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Home » Communication

How to (really) boost your communication factor at work

Submitted by on Monday, 8 July 2013No Comment

How to Boost your Communication Factor

Communication is a critical factor in the modern workplace, yet it’s amazing that, after millennia of evolution, we humans have not come up with a simple methodology to communicate with each other, especially in the workplace.

As the modern workplace becomes more fluid – with communication needing to take place between different people across cultures, languages, and stakeholders, and the pressure to deliver results always on, getting this communication factor right is at a massive premium.

Unfortunately, our friends in academia haven’t seemed to move with the times. The best they come up with almost every time (and copying this variation in different forms), is the communication model below. So save yourself an MBA and take a look:

Communication model

Got that? …We thought so!

What the modern manager really needs…

No doubt you will see the irony of spending hours and hours trying to deconstruct a model like the one above, in order to communicate… communication!

Instead, what the modern manager really needs to boost his or her communication factor is a tool that can be used again and again, so that the problem illustrated above becomes irrelevant. But first, it’s important to understand the the two key problems that arise when we communicate.

The 2 key problems with communication

Communication goes AWOL at work almost always because of:

· communication gaps, and

· ‘noise’

Gaps happen when a message is incomplete, or when an instruction hasn’t been given with the benefit of listening to some very important information the other party might have to give about ‘what’s happening on the ground’.

Noise usually means that communication is incongruent. For example, we might say that a deadline is in two days, but our body language and voice (‘speaking’ louder) might say ‘two weeks’. This kind of miscommunication happens all the time, and, in this simple example, could easily lead to a missed deadline.

This is why you need…

…Communication Factor

In our training programme Communication Factor, participants discover how to eliminate both gaps and noise by using a simple alphabetical approach to achieving clarity. All you need to remember when communicating is:

O – P – Q – R – S – T.

Here’s the slide taken from the Communication Factor programme below (you can download the slide in pdf format here):

Communication Factor

The above example is based on a project format. The ‘P‘ can also include People where no parts are involved.

What you can do now

If you like the above, and want to sharpen up your communication skills at work in one day, then why not have a look at  Communication Factor?

Full of hands-on activities (including using LEGO®), participants learn how to eliminate gaps and noise at work so that their communication is clear, congruent and concise and achieves the results that they want from work!

 

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